About Co-operatives

Housing co‑operatives provide not-for-profit housing for their members.

The members do not own equity in their housing. If they move, their home is returned to the co‑op, to be offered to another individual or family who needs an affordable home.

Some co‑op households pay a reduced monthly rent (housing charge) geared to their income. Government funds cover the difference between this payment and the co‑op’s full charge. Other households pay the full monthly charge based on cost.

Because co‑ops charge their members only enough to cover costs, repairs, and reserves, they can offer housing that is much more affordable than average private sector rental costs.

Co‑op housing also offers security. Co‑ops are controlled by their members who have a vote in decisions about their housing. There is no outside landlord.

Each housing co‑operative is a legal association, incorporated as a co‑operative. Canada’s housing co‑ops are guided by the international co-op principles:

ICA Co-op Logo

International Co-operative Principles:

The co-operative principles are guidelines by which co-operatives put their values into practice.

1. Voluntary and Open Membership

Co-operatives are voluntary organisations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political or religious discrimination

2. Democratic Member Control

Co-operatives are democratic organisations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting their policies and making decisions. Men and women serving as elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary co-operatives members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and co-operatives at other levels are also organised in a democratic manner.

3. Member Economic Participation

Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their co-operative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the co-operative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing their co-operative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the co-operative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.

4. Autonomy and Independence

Co-operatives are autonomous, self-help organisations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organisations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their co-operative autonomy.

5. Education, Training and Information

Co-operatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their co-operatives. They inform the general public – particularly young people and opinion leaders – about the nature and benefits of co-operation.

6. Co-operation among Co-operatives

Co-operatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the co-operative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.

7. Concern for Community

Co-operatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies approved by their members.

Housing co-operatives exist for their members’ common benefit. Like other co-operatives they promote individual responsibility, mutual help, democracy, equality, equity and solidarity. In the tradition of their founders, co-ops try to embody the ethical values of honesty, openness and concern for others and for the wider society.

Housing co-operatives are connected to a larger movement.  Glen Oaks Co-op is a member of:

Peel Halton CHF

Logo for Peel Halton FederationPeel Halton CHF is an association of member housing co-operatives that provides effective leadership and fosters the sharing of best practices through education, communication and the promotion of co-operative values for housing co-operatives in the regional municipalities of Peel, Halton Region and Dufferin County.

Peel Halton CHF offers it’s member co-op services including:

Co-operative Housing Federation of CanadaChf Canada Logo
A nation-wide umbrella organization for co‑op housing and Canada’s link with co‑op housing around the world.  CHF Canada represents over a 890 housing co-operatives across Canada.